Category: workshop

Paleofire data synthesis using R

2-6 October 2013, Frasne, France The GPWG workshop held in Frasne, in the Franche-Comte region, was sponsored by the University of Franche-Comte and PAGES. Participants from seven countries presented recent fire history investigations, developed new project ideas for future global

New tool development for paleofire data synthesis

1-6 May 2013, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA The GPWG workshop held in Utah was a gathering of the coordination team to identify and develop new tools for use bye the paleofire community. The meeting was structured around developing R

Dartington III workshop

1-5 October 2012, Dartington, UK The focus of the fourth GPWG (the third to be held at Dartington Hall) was on fire feedbacks. The ten participants represented diverse areas of research: from analysis of modern fire records, through fire modeling,

Records of biomass burning from sediments and ice cores

19-24 June 2012, Venice, Italy The Venice Paleofire Workshop focused on identifying research synergies among biomass burning records from ice cores and sedimentary records. Participants presented recent fire history research and discussed the pros and cons of a range of

Pages Open Science Meeting

8-11 July 2009, Corvallis, USA One focus of this workshop was on the role of Climate and human impacts on biomass burning during past millennia.

Third paleofires workshop

17-21 November 2008, Queens Court Exeter, UK One focus of this workshop will be the role of fire in global biogeochemical cycles from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. To facilitate these discussions, we are continuing our data collection efforts

Second paleofires workshop “Dartington II”

22-26 October 2007, Dartington Hall, UK The second Palaeofires Workshop was held 22-26 October, 2007 at Dartington Hall, Totnes, UK. This workshop, funded by PAGES, iLEAPS, and QUEST, explored several key research themes on palaeofires through the newly created Global

First paleofires workshop “Dartington I”

29 October-4 November 2006, Dartington Hall, UK The palaeo-record provides ideal opportunities for evaluating components of earth system models. Charcoal records, in combination with information about changes in vegetation distribution, can be used to evaluate state-of-art coupled vegetation-fire models. A